1

If you look down near the bottom of the list of StackExchange sites, you'll read about one that is described as:

Q&A for professors, theologians, and those interested in exegetical analysis of biblical texts

To me, the description is very dense and off-putting and I even know what all the words mean! Now I'm under no illusions that changing a few words in a description lots of people won't read will bring in a bunch of great, new question. But I do think we can loosen up the way we present ourselves a bit.

What do y'all suggest?


It seems like we aren't going to have anymore discussion on this, so I'm turning it into a feature request. Can someone with the proper authority change our short description to:

Q&A for people studying the Bible at any level

2

I also like the description of Math.SE. One way to adapt it to our topic is:

Q&A for people studying the Bible at any level

As Jack points out, the phrase about professionals is not technically necessary. And it needlessly introduces a possible barrier to entry.

3
  • I like this, but perhaps we don't even need the last 3 words? Or even the last 6? Feb 1 '12 at 16:16
  • @Jack: I think "at any level" helps establish that we don't reject questions that aren't doctrinal theses, but we have some very well trained contributors in addition to amateurs such as myself. But I could go for the even shorter version too if we, as a community, are ok with that.
    – Jon Ericson Mod
    Feb 1 '12 at 16:42
  • 1
    On reflection I agree +1 :-) Feb 1 '12 at 17:31
1

Our FAQ currently leads with:

Biblical Hermeneutics—Stack Exchange is for anyone who wants to know what the Bible means (exegesis) using the techniques or rules of interpretation (hermeneutics). We are an inclusive site and welcome Jewish, Christian, Atheist and other viewpoints as long as they take seriously the process of understanding the Biblical texts.

That's too long and convoluted for the short description, but we can cut it down to:

Q&A for anyone wishing to understand the Bible using the tools of interpretation

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .