5

I can concur much with what Dɑvïd said in his answer to your question here. However, while the close reason may have been "too broad," that may have been just what the "majority" of those voting to close picked. But I believe you have a more fundamental problem with your "main question": Do you think it is an accurate use of the biblical example of ...


4

Conceptually the point you've made in this meta question makes sense, but the specific instance cited doesn't match your argument. First let me point out that you've accepted an answer that's basically nothing but a logical fallacy. Your question asks for whether something was justifiable based on their situation at the time, then accepted an answer that ...


3

In general yes, you can copy your own answers anywhere you like. But use discretion to decide whether it truly does answer this new question. In this specific case, I'd say you probably shouldn't - only the final paragraph really applies to the new question. But if you flesh it out substantially, and trim the rest of the answer, so that it's the larger part ...


3

There is plenty of interest in the area you want to probe. My own sense is that your intention for the "supporting questions" backfired. I look at this and think: "This Q is basically = Everything I Ever Wanted to Know About Immigration in Ancient Israel -- And I'm Not Afraid to Ask!!" Either blow away your "supporting Qs", or rewrite them as background ...


2

Biblical Hermeneutics, the study of the Biblical texts, is only one discipline and both depends upon and informs the disciplines of theology. This has been called the Hermeneutical Circle, as illustrated by Don Carson: Our reading and interpretation of the Bible informs the theology that we develop from it. And although we might like to think that we can ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible