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Just type them like you would any other character. Posts on SE are encoded using Unicode which can handle just about any character from any known alphabet. The most common way to do this is using an input device configured for the language of your choice. Almost all operating systems have a system to add keyboard layouts for other languages. Adding more ...


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TL;DR—Questions dealing with interpretations of passages in languages other than English and the original biblical languages (and those of relevant, early interpretations) are off topic. This is a great question, and I've given quite a bit of thought to it. I found an official SE policy about non-English questions that is applicable to Stack Overflow, ...


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A good, free, online resource for coping with Hebrew and Greek is the Transliterate.com service provided by Logos Bible Software. If I copy/paste "πῶς οὐχὶ καὶ σὺν αὐτῷ τὰ πάντα ἡμῖν χαρίσεται;", for example, and click the "transform" button, it spits out: Latin transliteration = pō̂s ouchì kaì sỳn autō̂i tà pánta hēmîn charísetai? Society of Biblical ...


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Note: Posted as a community Wiki, please feel free to update. There are three different fonts available, at CAL TTF font link: The Edessa font - which is great for Syriac; the Hebrew Translation font, which displays the Syriac characters as Hebrew; And a Hebrew Web font. Aramaiac, Syriac New Testament and Lexicons: biblehub.com dukhrana.com Historical ...


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I propose that courtesy suggests providing an answer in the same language in which the question was asked. Although I do not personally have a problem with questions being asked in languages other than English, I understand that is not currently the direction the site wishes to pursue (and for some languages we don't have enough speakers to develop much of a ...


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